ACT 2017 - Support information and documents

This page contains information about the ACT Test and how to interpret and use student scores on the test. 
At the bottom of this page are documents to download for additional information.

Districts and community schools were mandated to administer a state-funded college and career readiness test to juniors in spring 2017 as one of their three diploma options. Our district selected the state-funded ACT college and career readiness test. 

The ACT® test is the nation’s most popular college entrance exam accepted and valued by all universities and colleges in the United States. The ACT is based on what students learn in high school and provides personalized information about their strengths for education and career planning. 

The ACT® contains multiple-choice tests in four areas: English, mathematics, reading and science. 


WHAT THE ACT MEASURES 

The ACT contains four multiple-choice tests—English, mathematics, reading, and science—and an optional writing test. These tests are designed to measure skills that are most important for success in postsecondary education and that are acquired in secondary education. The score range for each of the four multiple-choice tests is 1–36. The Composite score is the average of the four test scores rounded to the nearest whole number.

The ACT English test measures understanding of the conventions of standard English, production of writing, and knowledge of language.

The ACT mathematics test assesses the skills students typically acquire in courses taken through grade 11. The test questions require the use of reasoning skills to solve practical problems in mathematics. Knowledge of basic formulas and computational skills are assumed, but recall of complex formulas and extensive computation is not required.

The ACT reading test measures reading comprehension. The questions require the use of referring and reasoning skills to determine main ideas; locate and interpret significant details; understand sequences of events; make comparisons; comprehend cause-effect relationships; determine the meaning of context-dependent words, phrases, and statements; draw generalizations; and analyze voice and method.

The ACT science test measures the interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem-solving skills required in the natural sciences. Scientific information is conveyed in one of three formats: data representation, research summaries, or conflicting viewpoints. Questions require recognition and understanding of the basic features of, and concepts related to, the provided information; the critical examination of the relationship between the information provided and the conclusions drawn or hypotheses developed; and the generalization of given information to gain new information, draw conclusions, or make predictions.

The optional ACT writing test is an essay test that measures writing skills taught in high school English classes and entry level college composition courses. The test describes an issue and provides three different perspectives on the issue. Each student must (1) analyze and evaluate the given perspectives, (2) state and develop a perspective on the issue, and (3) explain the relationship between that perspective and those given. 

Colleges may view student essays using the free ACT Essay View tool.

Complete information about the ACT test is available in the technical manual.

SAMPLE QUESTIONS

Practice questions to give you a taste of what to expect on the ACT test.

Go to ACT Web Site to Understand Scores and How to Use Them

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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:14 PM
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William Mullane,
Apr 20, 2017, 1:15 PM